Defend The Right To Protest Rally

A rally outside NSW Parliament this morning urging the repeal of legislation that will diminish the right to assembly on public (Crown) land, thereby reducing the right of protest and freedom of speech.

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Blanket Patrol

Tonight commemorated the first anniversary of the closure of the 24/7 Street Kitchen and Safe Space at Martin Place, also known as Tent City to those living with homelessness around central Sydney.

To mark the date, a new initiative, 'The Blanket Patrol', was launched. The mobile community-led service distributes blankets and other essential items out of a wheelie bin to rough sleepers around the CBD.

It is hoped that similar Blanket Patrol initiatives will be rolled out around the country.

For more information, visit the 24/7 Street Kitchen and Safe Space Community page on Facebook, or call 0404 500 454.

Pictured below, local identity and rough sleeper, Lawrence, models next to one of the Blanket Patrol wheelie bins that will provide essential items to the homeless around Sydney.

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Miho

Traditional Okinawan dancer, Miho, stills herself as she prepares backstage in a storeroom-cum-makeshift greenroom before a performance.

 

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Dylan Voller and Don Dale - 2 Years On - Pt II

Today marked two years since the ABC's Four Corners report on Don Dale, the notorious youth detention centre in the Northern Territory, which saw a series of torture-like abuses of mostly Aboriginal children. One of the most infamous cases was the repeated abuse of then 13-year old Aboriginal boy, Dylan Voller, who was later placed in a 'restraint chair' and covered with a 'spit hood', reminiscent of tactics used at Guantanamo Bay.

Since the Four Corners program, there has been a Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory. That Commission reported last November without any charges being laid against any of the perpetrators of the abuses at Don Dale, despite finding 'shocking and systemic failures over many years in the youth prison system that were ignored at the highest levels of government.' In the last few months, there has been a string of rooftop protests by inmates at Don Dale, and the centre has been deemed still 'not fit for purpose', 'overcrowded and understaffed', despite the Royal Commission.

Below, Dylan Voller watches the original, harrowing Four Corners program, 2 years after the original broadcast caused widespread outrage. The program included graphic footage of Voller being abused and assaulted. Today's event took place at The Settlement community centre in Redfern where speakers and performers responded to ongoing violence against Aboriginal people in custody. Also in attendance was the family of David Dungay, who died in Long Bay Jail after being restrained and sedated by prison officers and whose death is the subject of a coronial inquest, which today was postponed for another 12 months.

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Dylan Voller and Don Dale - 2 Years On

Today marked two years since the ABC's Four Corners report on Don Dale, the notorious youth detention centre in the Northern Territory, which saw a series of torture-like abuses of mostly Aboriginal children. One of the most infamous cases was the repeated abuse of then 13-year old Aboriginal boy, Dylan Voller, who was later placed in a 'restraint chair' and covered with a 'spit hood', reminiscent of tactics used at Guantanamo Bay.

Since the Four Corners program, there has been a Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory. That Commission reported last November without any charges being laid against any of the perpetrators of the abuses at Don Dale, despite finding 'shocking and systemic failures over many years in the youth prison system that were ignored at the highest levels of government.' In the last few months, there has been a string of rooftop protests by inmates at Don Dale, and the centre has been deemed still 'not fit for purpose', 'overcrowded and understaffed', despite the Royal Commission.

Below, Dylan Voller watches the original, harrowing Four Corners program, 2 years after the original broadcast caused widespread outrage. The program included graphic footage of Voller being abused and assaulted. Today's event took place at The Settlement community centre in Redfern where speakers and performers responded to ongoing violence against Aboriginal people in custody. Also in attendance was the family of David Dungay, who died in Long Bay Jail after being restrained and sedated by prison officers and whose death is the subject of a coronial inquest, which today was postponed for another 12 months.

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Simone

Simone.

Tri-X 35mm black and white film.

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Vittorio, Piccolo Bar Cafe, Kings Cross

Local identity, Vittorio, at Sydney's oldest running cafe, the Piccolo, Kings Cross.

Tri-X 35mm black and white film.

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Glenn Lockitch, Piccolo Cafe

Photojournalist, Glenn Lockitch, relaxes at his second home, the Piccolo cafe, Kings Cross.

Tri-X 35mm black and white film.

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Jon Lewis

Photographer, Jon Lewis.

Tri-X 35mm black and white film.

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Friday On My Mind

Friday is a mountain brushtail possum. He is named 'Friday' because he was found on a Friday in his mother's pouch after she was hit by a car on Friday Hut Road, outside of Byron Bay in northern New South Wales. He was rescued by passerbys, who called the Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service (WIRES).

Lindy and Phil, long-time wildlife carers, are now rearing Friday. The baby possum must be bottle fed 4 times a day until he can feed on native foliage. Eventually, Friday will be released back into the wild, where he will face a torrid few months surviving against other male brushtails, who are notoriously territorial. Human reared possums are said to have an average survival rate of around 120 days, so Friday will have to be lucky to survive and thrive once released.

Below are images of Lindy, Phil and Friday at their home, outside of Byron.

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Pat and Ken

A chance meeting of two of my favourite Glebe residents and long time Aboriginal activists, Patricia Corowa and Uncle Ken Canning.

Glebe, 2018.

Shot on Kodak Tri-X 35mm black and white film.

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'David Dungay' - Say His Name: Coronial Inquest

In 2015, a 26-year old Dunghutti man, David Dungay Jnr had his prison cell in Long Bay Jail stormed after he refused to stop eating a packet of biscuits. David suffered from diabetes. Prison officers restrained and sedated Mr Dungay. He died soon after.

Today, family and supporters gathered at the Downing Centre in central Sydney to attend the beginning of a 2-week long Coronial inquest into Dungay's death. As graphic footage was played in court of the last moments of Dungay's life, several family members walked out. His mother Leetona, stayed to witness the footage, wiping away tears as she did so.

During the lunch time intermission, Leetona Dungay emerged from the court and addressed the media, calling for a full independent inquiry. Hawk Newsome, President of Black Lives Matter in the Greater New York was also in attendance and powerfully drew comparisons to Black American deaths at the hands of police in the USA. Calls were made not to forget David Dungay's case. The crowd chanted, "Say his Name! David Dungay!"

The inquest will continue for the next two weeks.

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Because Her We Can: Shay Shay

Throughout the last few days, over NAIDOC week celebrations, I have been posting a series of photographs of just some of the Aboriginal and Islander women who I admire and respect, who I have photographed over the years, and who epitomize this year's NAIDOC motto, 'Because of Her We Can'.

Being the final day of NAIDOC today, this is my last photograph of this series. Unfortunately, there are not enough days in the NAIDOC week to include all the deadly women I know - NAIDOC should be 52 weeks a year, not one.

Today, I am posting a photograph of Shay Shay - Sharon Lawrence - pictured here in 2015 playing at the Redfern Aboriginal Tent Embassy. For me, this photo represents the future of Aboriginal women: strong, free and determined, heading towards the future with an eye to the past.

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Because of Her We Can: Aunty Christine Kngwarraye Palmer

Throughout the next few days, over NAIDOC week celebrations, I will be posting a series of photographs of just some of the Aboriginal and Islander women who I admire and respect, who I have photographed over the years, and who epitomize this year's NAIDOC motto, 'Because of Her We Can'.

Today, I am posting a photograph of Arrente and Kaytetye woman, Aunty Christine Kngwarraye Palmer. Aunty Christine is a leading figure for Grandmothers Against Removals (GMAR) in central Australia.

GMAR is a grassroots organisation of concerned Aboriginal grandmothers and supporters who are fighting against the ongoing Government removal of Aboriginal children from their families - a process commonly understood as the 'Stolen Generation', but which continues unabated today. More Aboriginal children are being removed today than since ex-Prime Minister Rudd's 'apology' to the Stolen Generation in 2008 - in fact, removals are the highest than any point in history, having risen by 65% since Rudd's 'apology'.

Below is an image of Aunty Christine speaking in Canberra earlier this year at a national GMAR summit on 'Sorry Day'.

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NAIDOC - Inner City Naidoc Culture & Sports Day at the NCIE

Images from the community NAIDOC day at the National Centre of Indigenous Excellence in inner-city Redfern Waterloo.

The day centred on NAIDOC's theme, 'Because of Her We Can'. MCs Bronwyn and Angeline Penrith kicked off the day, which was followed by a women's healing ceremony, dance and music, including a special appearance by Marleen Cummins.

Photojournalist, Barbara McGrady, also opened her expansive exhibition on Aboriginal women.

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Because of Her We Can: Elizabeth Jarrett

Throughout the next few days, over NAIDOC week celebrations, I will be posting a series of photographs of just some of the Aboriginal and Islander women who I admire and respect, who I have photographed over the years, and who epitomize this year's NAIDOC motto, 'Because of Her We Can'.

Today, I am posting a photograph of Gumbaynggirr Dunghutti Bundjalung woman, mother, activist and poet, Elizabeth Jarrett and her son, at the Aboriginal Tent Embassy in Canberra.

In the portrait below, Elizabeth and her son are wearing T-Shirts demanding justice for David Dungay, whose prison cell in Long Bay Jail was stormed in 2015 after he refused to stop eating a packet of biscuits. David suffered from diabetes. Prison officers restrained and sedated Mr Dungay. He died soon after.

A coronial inquiry will commence next Monday, the 16th of July, to investigate the circumstances around David Dungay's death. Family and supporters, including Elizabeth Jarrett, will be gathering at the inquiry to highlight ongoing Aboriginal deaths in custody and to ensure the courts understand that attention is being focussed on the proceedings.

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Because of Her We Can: Kayleedah Hippi

Throughout the next few days, over NAIDOC week celebrations, I will be posting a series of photographs of just some of the Aboriginal and Islander women who I admire and respect, who I have photographed over the years, and who epitomize this year's NAIDOC motto, 'Because of Her We Can'.

Today, I am posting a photograph of Kayleedah Hippi, a young woman from the small town of Boggabilla, in north western NSW, on Gomeroi country.

Many young Aboriginal women are the future leaders of community and are increasingly attaining high levels of achievement on many levels, including academically, in business, culturally, on the sports field, and in the community, despite facing ongoing obstacles, such as lack of opportunities, racism and discrimination.

Below, a portrait of Kayleedah at home, Boggabilla - part of the series 'On Gomeroi'.

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Because of Her We Can: Nancy Yukuwal McDinny

Throughout the next few days, over NAIDOC week celebrations, I will be posting a series of photographs of just some of the Aboriginal and Islander women who I admire and respect, who I have photographed over the years, and who epitomize this year's NAIDOC motto, 'Because of Her We Can'.

Today, I am posting a portrait of elder, activist and artist, Nancy Yukuwal McDinny, a Garrwa woman from the Gulf of Carpentaria region.

For the past number of years, she has been leading the fight against mining giant, Glencore, and its expansion of the McArthur River mine, one of the biggest zinc, lead and silver mines in the world. The mine has been blamed for poisoning the river that several Aboriginal communities, including the nearby town of Borroloola, rely on. Further protests are planned around the country in the near future.

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Because of Her We Can: Lynda-June Coe

Throughout the next few days, over NAIDOC week celebrations, I will be posting a series of photographs of just some of the Aboriginal and Islander women who I admire and respect, who I have photographed over the years, and who epitomize this year's NAIDOC motto, 'Because of Her We Can'.

Today, I am posting a portrait of Lynda-June Coe, a Wiradjuri and Torres Strait Islander woman from Erambie, Cowra NSW. Lynda is at the forefront of a wave of young, powerful Aboriginal women activists demanding justice and rights for Aboriginal peoples. She is a representative of FISTT, Fighting in Solidarity Towards Treaties.

Lynda is pictured below outside the studios of Channel 7 protesting against the Sunrise program, which broadcast views arguing for the removal of Aboriginal children from their families - in effect, a second stolen generation. The Sunrise program is currently being investigated by the Australian Communication and Media Authority (ACMA).

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